Hamiln Hills owner Lee Hamlin welcomes visitors to The Dead Maize. (Photo/Steve Reece)

Hamiln Hills owner Lee Hamlin welcomes visitors to The Dead Maize. (Photo/Steve Reece)

The story goes that on Oct. 13, 1971, a military helicopter from Ft. Benning loaded with Agent Orange flew over Monroe County and collided with a crop duster dusting a cornfield at what is now known as Hamlin Hills just over the interstate on Hwy. 18. Unfortunately, besides the helicopter crew and the airplane pilot, some civilian workers on the farm were also killed. Due to a decision by the military to leave the aircraft there because of the chemical biohazard, you can see the rusty remains of the crash from the highway to this day. A government agency reportedly visits the site yearly to take soil samples from spots in the field where corn refuses to grow in the interest of public health. Now, just in time for Halloween, you too can visit the crash site. 

Lee Hamlin teamed up with Matt Robichaux last August and together they came up with the above concept for a show called “The Dead Maize” that runs from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. every Friday, Saturday, and Sunday for the next four weeks. Tickets are $15. Robichaux is well-known at the local Rose Theater as an actor, director, and set designer and with his talents, Hamlin believes audiences will love the action. 

Groups of five to six are led through the cornfield by a federal agent who explains they can’t go back the way they came because of contamination and there are many surprises along the trail to safety. Matt’s script calls for 32 costumed actors out in the field and if anyone would like to join his scary team, text him at 478-993-7757.